english 402

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Professional & Technical Writing

PORTFOLIO 2
RFP & PROPOSAL

A TEAM PROJECT

25% of course grade

THIS PORTFOLIO IS THE MOST TIME CONSUMING OF THE THREE. PLAN NOW!

 

NOTICE! <--- READ ME FIRST!

NEXT: Figure out how your team will interact. How will you communicate? When will you communicate? How often? Where will you communicate? via email? ANGEL? Text? Are you able to meet face-to-face? A combinationof these approaches? What works for your team?

What milestones should you set in order to see the project come to fruition in a professional manner?

Start planning now!


SAMPLE PORTFOLIO
Project for the larger community
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SAMPLE PORTFOLIO 2
Project for the campus (forthcoming)


Everyone on the team read the assignment sheet.

Does everyone have the same interpretation? What questions do you have for me? Let's make sure EVERYONE is on the same page.

 

This assignment has 3 DELIVERABLES

1) proposal
2) RFP
3) Assessment/Reflection (either team or individual)

HINT: Referring to your textbook is CRUCIAL.

RESOURCES
IN YOUR
TEXTBOOK

Proposal 617-627
RFP 599-602
Progress Reports Ch 21

DUE: see calendar.html
Emailed to me as .pdf. Subject line: 402--Team# / Portfolio 2

 

SCENARIO:

Building on your previous course experience and portfolios, we will again address the rhetorical situation (audience, purpose, text) and its role in the production of various communications through design, layout, visual appeal, ethical considerations, usability, and document genre.

Now, you are asked to apply these concepts to the Request for Proposal (RFP) and Proposal documents.

 

THIS PROJECT IS A TEAM PROJECT.

 

ON TEAM PROJECTS & TEAM BUILDING,
EVERYONE READ THE FOLLOWING RESOURCES:

10 QUALITIES OF AN EFFECTIVE TEAM PLAYER



HOW TO WORK WELL IN A TEAM ENVIRONMENT


LEARNING EFFECTIVELY THROUGH GROUPWORK


 

THREE STEPS FOR MAKING GROUP DECISIONS:
(such as when delegating, drafting or designing together)

1. Propose 
2. Deliberate
3. Ratify

Repeat these steps for each idea that could potentially effect the others' workflow. For lower level things (like editing, etc) you don't need to. 

 

MEETING & COLLABORATING TOOLS

Not everyone can meet face-to-face. Afterall, this is an online course. Getting to meet face-to-face should be considered a luxury. It cannot be deemed mandatory by any team.

Meetings do not have to happen in the same geography, and there are tools to help with this. You can collaborate without ever meeting face-to-face.

DOODLE (appointment scheduler)

DROPBOX (a shared central location for documents)
GOOGLE DOCS (a shared central location for documents)
SKYPE (an "online/f2f" meeting space using your webcam)
GOOGLE HANGOUT (an "online/f2f" meeting space; webcam)
DOODLE (schedule meetingsuse email to



Portfolio Goals

Instruction in Technical and Professional Writing is concentrated around five core-concepts, which provide students with the theoretical foundations needed to analyze workplace practices and develop documentation (print and digital) for a variety of communication situations. These core concepts include:

Rhetorical Analysis - write for a range of defined audiences and stakeholders

Document Design - make rhetorical design decisions about workplace documents implementing design principles of font, format and layout

Editing for Clarity & Conciseness - Draft, research, test, and revise visual designs and information architecture

Genres of Workplace Writing - understand and adapt to genre conventions and audience expectations

Workplace Practices & Collaboration - Understand, develop and deploy various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents both individually and collaboratively

Project Deliverables
(3 documents total)

PART 1: Proposal
You are probably already aware of issues that you, or other students, face in your community (In Tri-Cities, the more general area, or evem on campus).

Your job is to identify a problem or a need and write to fill that need. That is, you will write a formal, unsolicited proposal to the decision makers who could address your issue.

Use the proposal as an opportunity to bring the problem to the attention of the city leaders or the administration. Explain the details and conditions of the issue, and provide a possible solution.

Remember to follow the steps of a good proposal in chapter 20 and include all pertinent parts of the proposal.

The general purpose of any proposal is to persuade the readers to do something, whether it is to persuade a potential customer to purchase goods and/or services, or to persuade your employer to fund a project or to implement a program that you would like to launch. 

Any proposal offers a plan to fill a need, and your reader will evaluate your plan according to how well your written presentation answers questions about WHAT you are proposing, HOW you plan to do it, WHEN you plan to do it, and HOW MUCH it is going to cost. 

SOURCE: http://facstaff.gpc.edu/~ebrown/pracguid.htm

 

REGARDING CAMPUS-RELATED RESEARCH:

REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION FROM ANY PERSON OR DEPARTMENT AT WSU must be sent to me for approval before proceeding.

Draft your request and send to me for review/approval before they go forth to people outside of our class.

For help with letter writing, refer to reliiable sources for formatting and content of formal business letters.

LETTER WRITING RESOURCES

IN YOUR TEXTBOOK:
Basic Elements of Letters (pages 270-274)
Letters of Inquiry (pages 388-389 abd 404, 409)

OUTSTANDING OUTSIDE SOURCE:
University of Wisconsin Writing Center

No funding for your project?
Take a look at some of the grant organizations out there who might (just might) fund a project such as yours:

A Source for Available Grants
Grants for Washington
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Grants.gov (Grants for Individuals)
Tony Stewart Foundation

 

Grant Proposal Writing (short course)

 

ed norton / crowdwise
KICKSTARTER

NOTE: If you find other sources, please share the link with me so I could post them here! Thx!

CITE YOUR SOURCES!
You've probably researched some costs involved, or some equipment needed, or other pertinent facts. Make SURE you cite these. Both in-text and on a References or Works Cited page.

If you use it, you must cite it.

 

PART 2: Request for Proposal (RFP)

SAMPLE RFP AT TECH SOUP

After reading your unsolicited, formal proposal and suggested solution, the administration is interested in acting upon your ideas. They suspect, however, that other students and community organizations might also have some good suggestions. The administrator you sent your proposal to was so impressed with your work that s/he has put you in charge of creating the RFP to respond to the issue you wrote your proposal about to get further input. Remember to be very specific, to include only the standard sections of an RFP that actually apply in your case, to consider ethical implications, and to consider technology needs and constraints as well.

Some possible resources/examples include:

Short Explanation of an RFP

Create Your Own RFP

3 Tips ("Be's") for Writing RFPs

The Ideal [???] RFP

Janisich Writing RFPs

Tech Republic 10 Things About RFPs

 

NOTE: CITE YOUR SOURCES!
You've probably researched some costs involved, or some equipment needed, or other pertinent facts. Make SURE you cite these. Both in-text and on a References or Works Cited page.

 

PART 3: Project Assessment (reflection)
Your 500-word project assessment document should answer most of the following questions, each of which is tied to the major goals of the assignment:

  • Rhetorical analysis – How did the particular proposal and RFP you wrote shift depending on your audience or situation? Did it change or affect how you presented yourself? How did crafting these documents help you understand how to read and interpret RFPs and Proposals?
  • Document design – What is the most effective aspect of your deliverables in terms of presentation or design? Have you deliberately adapted a standard form in an unusual or creative way? If so, why?
  • Editing for clarity and conciseness – What was the most challenging document to produce and why? Briefly describe and explain one of the significant revisions you made to this document after your initial draft.
  • Genres of workplace writing – What genres for each deliverable did you select? Why?
  • Workplace practices and collaboration – How well did you plan your work on this project? What might you have done differently? What differences did you note in not having peer feedback on this project?

I allow each team to determine whether they write a group reflection or individual reflections. If the team decides on individual projects for this portion of the portfioio, the file names MUST begin with the Team#. Thanks!

 
Grading

The RFP & Proposal portfolio is worth 25% of your course grade. The breakdown for each of its components is as follows:

  • Proposal (40%)
  • RFP (40%)
  • Project Assessment (20%)

Grading Criteria
When grading your project, I will pay particular attention to the following criteria:

  • Persuasiveness
  • Content
  • Design
  • Completeness
  • Clarity
  • Organization
  • Creativity

Submitting Your Work for Credit
All three (3) documents must be submitted as PDF files in a email to me.

Use apprpropriate file naming conventions for each document.

For example, your file names should be as follows:
TEAM#_PORT2_PROPOSALpdf
TEAM#_PORT2_RFP.pdf
TEAM#_PORT2_REFLECTION.pdf (If team reflection)
TEAM#_PORT2_LaestName_Reflection.pdf
(if solo reflections)

Check the CALENDAR.HTML page for milestones and due dates.