english 201

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COURSE SYLLABUS

ENGLISH 201
Nonfiction & Inquiry
   S   Y   L   L   A   B   U   S

 

 

ONLINE & ASYNCHRONOUS
SPRING 2013

English 201: Nonfiction Writing & Research 

Instructor: Dr. Suzanne Webb (contact info here)

Designed to develop students' researching skills for writing across the disciplines. Working across some of the tools offered up by nonfiction. In this course, we'll read nonficiton, analyse nonfiction, use nonfiction to help us conduct inquiry, and we'll write nonfiction. The end products produced will tell a variety of stories--

 

TEXTS & MATERIALS

  1. Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom--John C. Bean
  2. Composition in a New Key, by Kathleen Yancey
  3. Consider the Lobster” by David Foster Wallace
  4. “Ticket to the Fair” by David Foster Wallace
  5. Other Readings to be posted in ANGEL

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this 16-week course, we will explore---through discussion, research, reading, and writing---our own communities and through them, the larger world.

We will read critically; think critically; and write about these explorations of our own beliefs. We will try to become members of “the writing public” by discovering and using the internet as a means to share our works.


COURSE GOALS

Identify problems (in the real world) and attempt to solve them with writing

To do this, we will

MAJOR PROJECTS & GRADING POLICY

Assignment

 

Points

Basic Description

P1 Response: What Does Yancey Want?

 

100

2-3 page

P2 What Does Wallace Want?

 

100

2-3 page

P3 DWDFWD
Inquiry & Analysis

 

100

3-4 page

P4 Annotated Bib

 

100

10 sources, 2 must be the result of field work

P5 Research Paper

 

100

6-8 pages + MLA documentation - MLA GUIDE

P6 Re-Remix the Research

 

100

Digital and/or print accompaniments

P7 Presentation

 

100

Presenting your work to your peers

P8 Reflection

 

100

Final Essay: Reflecting on Things Learned

Participation & Daily Assign

 

200

Daily class work, group work, drafting, peer reviewing, discussion boards, emailing me when you have a question, etc.

 

 

1000

 

Grading Scale:


A

96-100%

B

84-87%

C

72-75%

D

60-63%

A-

92-95%

B-

80-83%

C-

68-71%

 

 

B+

88-91%

C+

76-79%

D+

64-67%

 

 

 

Attendance and Participation: 
Participation is ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL. You are expected to respond to activities and assignments in a timely fashion and to participate in all group activities in ANGEL. It is essential to your success in this course to think of our class as a community in which you are an important member. Think of it as a workplace. Everyone on each team will have jobs and tasks and work for the good of the whole. Just like the workplace. Non-participation in the assignment is not like simply choosing not to speak during class. In this case, non-participation will mean that you do not pass the course.

LATE WORK
I do not accept late work. Talk to me before it’s too late.

NOTE: I do not accept late work. Seriously—talk to me before it becomes late!

COURSE COMPLETION / ASSIGNMENT REQUIREMENT
All major projects MUST be completed and turned in in order to pass this course.

CLASSROOM & ONLINE CITIZENSHIP
How do we respect differences?
We all must feel comfortable, and we all must have respect for one another even though our viewpoints may, can, will differ. We need to grant another’s right to their beliefs—even if something they are saying seems “wrong.” Because of this, I ask that we give one another the utmost respect. Who knows, maybe we’ll learn a little something new about each other, our different cultures, and our different lives.

Academic Honesty:

LINK TO WSU OFFICIAL DOCUMENTATION

Academic dishonesty, including all forms of cheating, plagiarism, and fabrication, is prohibited, as is knowingly facilitating academic dishonesty. The expectation of the university is that all students will accept these standards and conduct themselves as responsible members of the academic community. These standards should be interpreted by students as general notice of prohibited conduct. They should be read broadly, and are not designed to define misconduct in exhaustive forms. Faculty and their departments have jurisdiction over academic dishonesty discovered in their courses.

For this course, carefully read the information on academic dishonesty in the WSU Student Handbook. You can find this information at http://www.tricity.wsu.edu/student_handbook_pullman.htm under “Standard of Conduct for All Students”, Part III.  According to this section of the student handbook, “Academic dishonesty includes cheating, falsification, fabrication, multiple submission, plagiarism, abuse of academic materials, complicity, or misconduct in research.” Plagiarism is “knowingly representing the work of another as one’s own, without proper acknowledgment of the source.…Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, submitting as one’s own work the work of a ‘ghost writer’ or work obtained from a commercial writing service; quoting directly or paraphrasing closely from a source without giving proper credit; using figures, graphs, charts, or other such material without identifying the sources.” Each student is responsible for knowing and adhering to the university’s standards for honesty in his/her academic work.

For a first violation of the academic honesty policy, students will fail the assignment, the office in charge of student conduct will be notified of the violation, and the student may be required to attend a workshop. For a second offense, the student may appear before the university conduct board and may be dismissed from the university. Exception: if the instructor or board determines that the academic dishonesty is particularly egregious or blatant the student may be dismissed from the university, even if it is the first offense. 

Copyright:
Students can find the WSU copyright policy at http://www.wsu.edu/Copyright.html. Students are expected to read and adhere to this policy and copyright laws.

Americans with Disability Act (ADA) Statement:
*Disability Services Reasonable Accommodations Statement: 
Reasonable accommodations are available for students who have a documented disability. Classroom accommodation forms are available through the Disability Services Office.  If you have a documented disability, even temporary, make an appointment as soon as possible with the Disability Services Coordinator, Cherish Tijerina, Room 269J West Building. You will need to provide your instructor with the appropriate classroom accommodation form.  The form should be completed and submitted during the first week of class. Late notification can delay your accommodations or cause them to be unavailable.  All accommodations for disabilities must be approved through the Disability Services Coordinator. 

Cherish Tijerina
Disability Services Coordinator
372-7352
ctijerina@tricity.wsu.edu <mailto:ctijerina@tricity.wsu.edu>


Subject to Change Clause: 
This syllabus, course calendar, and accompanying documents are subject to change at the instructor’s discretion. Notification will be provided in the form of an email, an announcement in ANGEL and/or an announcement on the course website home page. Keep abreast of any/all changes.

 

Course Calendar (Readings & Major Assignments)

Course Website Home